Top Ten Tuesday

toptentuesday

 

 

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and the Bookish is Top Ten Best Beach Reads. I’m not generally one to discriminate between “beach read” and “non-beach read”–I typically just lug along whatever I’m reading at the time–so maybe you don’t consider these to be the best sea- or poolside reading material. It’s just sort of a hodgepodge of books that I either have read by the pool or at the beach, think would be good to read there, or intend to read there on my vacation this year. On y va!

1. Attachments, Rainbow Rowell: I read this by the pool last year and thus I will always consider this a summer book. A relatively quick read with an engrossing, sometimes heartbreaking plot and characters you want to hug and befriend. Now that I’ve read more of her work, I know this is typical Rainbow Rowell. She’s just fantastic with characterization.

2. Eleanor & Park, Rainbow Rowell: Another great one, for all the aforementioned reasons.

3. Tender is the Night,  F. Scott Fitzgerald: I know a lot of people are jumping on the Gatsby train this year because of the movie, and you should do yourself a favor and check out more of Fitzgerald’s work. He is one of my favorite authors and Tender is the Night is one of my favorite of his books. Taking place on the French Riviera in the 1920s, it tells the story of the disintegration of It Couple Dick and Nicole Diver’s marriage, as well as the disillusionment of starlet Rosemary Hoyt.

4. Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir, Jenny Lawson: This book is quite honestly one of the most hilarious things I’ve ever read. Only read it it public if you aren’t ashamed of unbridled laughter.

5. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen: I read this for the first time on the beach so again, this is a summer read to me. Froth, fun, romance–why not?

6. The Lost Girl, Sangu Mandanna: I would read this in a box. I would read this with a fox. I would read this here or there. I would read this anywhere (including the beach).

7. Good for You, Tammara Webber: This is the third book in Webber’s Between the Lines series, so you have to read Between the Lines and Where You Are to get to this one… but it is definitely the strongest of the three out so far, and the final installment, Here Without You, will be released in time for my beach trip in August. I sense a series reread and some pretending my eyes are just watering because I got sand in them.

8. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), Mindy Kaling: Another hilarious memoir. Mindy and I would most likely be BFFs IRL.

9. Going Too Far, Jennifer Echols: My main gripe with Jennifer Echols’ books is that the resolutions seem to come about so abruptly. This one, however, is a fun, quick read and full of zany characters and witty repartee.

10. The Awakening, Kate Chopin: If you read it you will understand why I consider it “beachy.”

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Eleanor & Park — Rainbow Rowell

4/5 stars
Goodreads summary: TWO MISFITS. ONE EXTRAORDINARY LOVE. 
It’s 1986 and two star-crossed teens are smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try. When Eleanor meets Park, you’ll remember your own first love–and just how hard it pulled you under.

 A cross between the iconic ’80s movie Sixteen Candles and the classic coming-of-age novel Looking for Alaska, Eleanor & Park is a brilliantly written young adult novel.

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Attachments — Rainbow Rowell

4/5 stars

Summary from Goodreads: “Hi, I’m the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you . . . ” 
Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It’s company policy.) But they can’t quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives.
Meanwhile, Lincoln O’Neill can’t believe this is his job now- reading other people’s e-mail. When he applied to be “internet security officer,” he pictured himself building firewalls and crushing hackers- not writing up a report every time a sports reporter forwards a dirty joke.
When Lincoln comes across Beth’s and Jennifer’s messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can’t help being entertained-and captivated-by their stories.
By the time Lincoln realizes he’s falling for Beth, it’s way too late to introduce himself.
What would he say . . . ? Continue reading