Article 5 — Kristen Simmons

2.5/5 stars
Goodreads summary: New York, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C., have been abandoned.

The Bill of Rights has been revoked, and replaced with the Moral Statutes.

There are no more police—instead, there are soldiers. There are no more fines for bad behavior—instead, there are arrests, trials, and maybe worse. People who get arrested usually don’t come back.

Seventeen-year-old Ember Miller is old enough to remember that things weren’t always this way. Living with her rebellious single mother, it’s hard for her to forget that people weren’t always arrested for reading the wrong books or staying out after dark. It’s hard to forget that life in the United States used to be different.

Ember has perfected the art of keeping a low profile. She knows how to get the things she needs, like food stamps and hand-me-down clothes, and how to pass the random home inspections by the military. Her life is as close to peaceful as circumstances allow.

That is, until her mother is arrested for noncompliance with Article 5 of the Moral Statutes. And one of the arresting officers is none other than Chase Jennings—the only boy Ember has ever loved.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Top Ten Tuesday

toptentuesday

 

 

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday from The Broke and the Bookish is Top Ten Best Beach Reads. I’m not generally one to discriminate between “beach read” and “non-beach read”–I typically just lug along whatever I’m reading at the time–so maybe you don’t consider these to be the best sea- or poolside reading material. It’s just sort of a hodgepodge of books that I either have read by the pool or at the beach, think would be good to read there, or intend to read there on my vacation this year. On y va!

1. Attachments, Rainbow Rowell: I read this by the pool last year and thus I will always consider this a summer book. A relatively quick read with an engrossing, sometimes heartbreaking plot and characters you want to hug and befriend. Now that I’ve read more of her work, I know this is typical Rainbow Rowell. She’s just fantastic with characterization.

2. Eleanor & Park, Rainbow Rowell: Another great one, for all the aforementioned reasons.

3. Tender is the Night,  F. Scott Fitzgerald: I know a lot of people are jumping on the Gatsby train this year because of the movie, and you should do yourself a favor and check out more of Fitzgerald’s work. He is one of my favorite authors and Tender is the Night is one of my favorite of his books. Taking place on the French Riviera in the 1920s, it tells the story of the disintegration of It Couple Dick and Nicole Diver’s marriage, as well as the disillusionment of starlet Rosemary Hoyt.

4. Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir, Jenny Lawson: This book is quite honestly one of the most hilarious things I’ve ever read. Only read it it public if you aren’t ashamed of unbridled laughter.

5. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen: I read this for the first time on the beach so again, this is a summer read to me. Froth, fun, romance–why not?

6. The Lost Girl, Sangu Mandanna: I would read this in a box. I would read this with a fox. I would read this here or there. I would read this anywhere (including the beach).

7. Good for You, Tammara Webber: This is the third book in Webber’s Between the Lines series, so you have to read Between the Lines and Where You Are to get to this one… but it is definitely the strongest of the three out so far, and the final installment, Here Without You, will be released in time for my beach trip in August. I sense a series reread and some pretending my eyes are just watering because I got sand in them.

8. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), Mindy Kaling: Another hilarious memoir. Mindy and I would most likely be BFFs IRL.

9. Going Too Far, Jennifer Echols: My main gripe with Jennifer Echols’ books is that the resolutions seem to come about so abruptly. This one, however, is a fun, quick read and full of zany characters and witty repartee.

10. The Awakening, Kate Chopin: If you read it you will understand why I consider it “beachy.”

When We Wake — Karen Healey

4/5 stars
Goodreads summary: Sixteen-year-old Tegan is just like every other girl living in 2027—she’s happiest when playing the guitar, she’s falling in love for the first time, and she’s joining her friends to protest the wrongs of the world: environmental collapse, social discrimination, and political injustice.

But on what should have been the best day of Tegan’s life, she dies—and wakes up a hundred years later, locked in a government facility with no idea what happened.

The future isn’t all she had hoped it would be, and when appalling secrets come to light, Tegan must make a choice: Does she keep her head down and survive, or fight for a better world?

Award-winning author Karen Healey has created a haunting, cautionary tale of an inspiring protagonist living in a not-so-distant future that could easily be our own.

Continue reading